Tag Archives: church

Stony-faced

Monday 28th December 2020, 1.25pm (day 3,413)

Southwell faces, 28/12/20

Our Christmas tiered tour (it’s a Bojo the Clown thing) of central and eastern England continued, and ended, at Southwell in Nottinghamshire. A place to break the homeward journey, thanks to it being a very small town with a very large church, the Minster. These carvings rest on the wall of the bishop’s palace, facing the churchyard. Purely decorative? Or perhaps a warning, the petrified remnants of excommunicated souls? There are only these two. Going monochrome fits their age but also disguises the distracting bright green flash of moss to bottom centre.

Seven new places in seven days — a blog record. (Easton-on-the-Hill, Cromer, Norwich, Beeston Regis, Wells-next-the-Sea, Horsey and Southwell.)

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All Saints church, Beeston Regis

Friday 25th December 2020, 12 noon (day 3,410)

All Saints, Beeston Regis, 25/12/20

What ho, it’s Christmas. I try to get out on a walk on this day if possible: seems somehow more respectful (to myself, as much as anything) to do more than just consume. There’s even a Christianity reference here thanks to the well-sited church. Though what the giant cotton bud is doing out in the North Sea I do not know. For more pictures from today see my County Tops blog. And a happy Christmas to you all, whatever you were doing, however you celebrated it, in this particular time.

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Heptonstall Church(es)

Thursday 2nd April 2020, 1.35pm (day 3,143)

Heptonstall churches, 2/4/20

For obvious reasons none of the present run of photos are being taken very far away from one another. This one looks across the valley of the Nutclough Woods, above our house, towards the two churches of Heptonstall, one extant and one ruined: they share a churchyard, and look further apart on this shot than they are in reality. The yellow stuff? Not sure of the exact species, but the buds confirm that spring is on its way, out there in the world where we used to play.

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St. Pancras New Church

Monday 16th September 2019, 8.35am (day 2,944)

St. Pancras New Church, 16/9/19

“New” is relative; this building was being built 200 years ago today, and was eventually consecrated in May 1822 to serve the residents of the new London suburb of Bloomsbury on what was, at that point, the edge of the city. The caryatid columns seen here now look out over Euston Road and all its carbon monoxide fumes. But they’ve lasted longer than the rest of us, and will continue to endure unless the HS2 rail link takes them out (I wouldn’t put it past the present administration).

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The Abbaye de Villers

Tuesday 6th August 2019, 12.40pm (day 2,903)

Villers Abbey, 6/8/19

This abbey was built by the Cistercians in the 12th century and finally abandoned after being sacked by French revolutionaries at the end of the 18th. Much of it is still basically standing, and makes a truly magnificent ruin. Second picture in a row stood somewhere in Belgium and basically pointing the camera upwards; this roof has a kind of space alien look to it, like we are looking up into the mothership at the end of Close Encounters or Independence Day.

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4th July gathering, Hallgrimskirkja

Thursday 4th July 2019, 5.05pm (day 2,870)

Hallgrimskirkja, 4/7/19

The Hallgrimskirkja is Reykjavik’s most distinctive architectural landmark. The design is meant to reflect basalt columns and thus the country’s volcanic geology. The statue in front is of Leif Eiriksson, who got to America several centuries before Columbus; it was presented by the USA to Iceland in 1930 and today seemed to be the focus of a 4th July gathering as a result, although maybe it was just a big bunch of tourists celebrating the fact that after 36 hours of rain since we arrived yesterday morning, the sun finally put in an appearance. Let’s hope it stays….

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View of Heptonstall

Sunday 23rd December 2018, 10.35am (day 2,677)

Misty Heptonstall, 23/12/18

On the drive over to parents and parents-in-law for Christmas, a view over to Heptonstall, which rises above Hebden Bridge (being the original village) and has featured on many pictures in the past. Perhaps I have post-processed this one too much but with the continuing grey light, in colour this one looked kind of wan and washed out, the mist being just patches of out-of-focus space. In black and white I prefer it and the church comes out more.

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Inside Paddy’s Wigwam

Wednesday 24th May 2017, 2.35pm (day 2,099)

Paddy's Wigwam, 24/5/17

A work trip to Liverpool today (which thanks to recent events required a train tour of most of West Yorkshire and Lancashire to reach). After I had finished there was time to pop into ‘Paddy’s Wigwam’, a.k.a. the Metropolitan Cathedral of Christ the King, a modernist masterpiece that started falling down soon after it was finished in the 1960s but seems now to have been finished properly and become a permanent fixture. It is one of those buildings that is very difficult to capture from close up or from any single point within. I changed my mind about this shot at the very last minute but I guess it is my best attempt: I like the way there is no ‘front’ to it, instead the altar is in the centre, which feels more democratic.

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Carmo convent ruins

Wednesday 27th July 2016, 3.00pm (day 1,798)

Carmo convent, 27/7/16

At around 9.30am on 1st November 1755, when most of the population were at Mass, Lisbon was hit by a massive earthquake. The more I hear about this the more it is clear this was one of the most devastating single events in human history. Within a very short time a combination of collapsing buildings, fires, and a tsunami had killed 60,000 people. This building, the former Carmo convent, is one of the few remaining from that date; an attempt was made to rebuild it but not that long afterwards Portugal abolished the monasteries anyway, so it was never finished (or refinished). It now stands as a memorial to 1/11/1755, and the fragility of our existence, or something like that.

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Board games festival

Saturday 29th August 2015, 4.55pm (day 1,465)

Meepfest, 29/8/15

Anyone who has documented every day of their lives online for more than four years cannot but be at least part-geek, so things like festivals of board games appeal to me, and I wasn’t even the member of the family who initiated this trip to “MeepFest” in Leeds today. (No, it wasn’t Joe either.) Great setting, a church in Leeds now converted to an arts centre. Good fun gaming, too.

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